Last of El Morro

Etiched in these rocks is a picture of the people who lived here or just passed through when this was a train stop on the way to Arizona and California.

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Till next time:

All photos by Joanna Linsley-Poe

Copyright 2015 All,rights reserved

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El Morro, New Mexico  part 4 

Here in lies the Water!

The Publoian Indians came here for water long before the Spanish ( Hispanic ) came to this land. 

The photo with the tall grass in front is the best I could get without falling in the pool which is 12 feet deep when full.

Notice the markings on the rock face where the water flows over it.

The other photos are in and around the ” watering hole”. 

 
  
The trail above leads to the pool.

  

  

  

Till next time..

All photos taken by Joanna Linsley -Poe

Copyright 2015 All rights reserved


El Morro, New Mexico Part 3

More Photos, in a couple you can make out inscriptions left by travelers.

Paso por aqui…
Imagine the comfort and refreshment of finding water after days of dusty travel. A reliable waterhole hidden at the base of a sandstone bluff made El Morro (the headland) a popular campsite for hundreds of years. Here, Ancestral Puebloans, Spanish and American travelers carved over 2,000 signatures, dates, messages, and petroglyphs

So says The National Park Service web site:

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Even full size it’s hard to see the inscriptions, but trust me going there is worth the experience.

Tell me what you see, and if nothing they are great close ups of the rock there.

Till next Time…

All Photos by:

Joanna Linsley-Poe

Copyright 2015 All rights reserved.

 

 

 

El Morro, New Mexico 

Somewhere along the line I missed posting my photos of El Morro, here are a few to start.

The text, which may be hard to read on the first photo say’s as follows:

Until it was passed by the railroad in the 1880’s it’s water hole made El Morro an important  stop for travelers in the Acoma-Zuni region. Numerous incrtions carved in the Sandstone date from prehistoric, Spanish, Mexican and Territorial periods in New Mexico’s history. An important example is Onate’s inscription carved in 1605.

   

     
Till next time…

All photos taken by Joanna Linsley- Poe

Copyright 2015 all rights reserved.